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covenmouse:

Y!Writer 5

What is yWriter?

yWriter is a word processor which breaks your novel into chapters and scenes, helping you keep track of your work while leaving your mind free to create. It will not write your novel for you, suggest plot ideas or perform creative tasks of any kind. yWriter was designed by an author, not a salesman!

yWriter5 is free to download and use, but you’re encouraged to register your copy if you find it useful.

If you’re just embarking on your first novel a program like yWriter may seem like overkill. I mean, all you have to do is type everything into a word processor! Sure, but wait until you hit 20,000 words, with missing scenes and chapters, notes all over your desk, characters and locations and plot points you’ve just added and which need to be referenced earlier … it becomes a real struggle. Now imagine that same novel at 40,000 or 80,000 words! No wonder most first-time writers give up.

(Although yWriter was designed for novels, enterprising users have created their own translation files to customise the program to work with plays, non-fiction and even sermons.)

What’s so special about yWriter?

I [Simon Haynes, the program author] really struggled with my first novel because I wrote slabs of text into a big word processor file and I just couldn’t make sense of the whole thing at once. No real overview, no easy jumping from scene to scene, nothing.

Next I tried saving each chapter to an individual file, with descriptive filenames, but moving scenes between files was a nuisance and I still couldn’t get an overview of the whole thing (or easily search for one word amongst 32 files)

My last attempt to use Word involved saving every scene as an individual file - e.g. Chapter 01 Scene 01 - Hal Spacejock Gets a Job.doc. That was fantastic until I decided to move one scene three chapters ahead, and had to manually rename all the files. Then I decided to put it back again! I could never remember which of the 200+ files contained a note I was looking for either.

As a programmer I’m used to dealing with projects broken into source files and modules, and I never lose track of my code. I decided to apply the same working method to my novels … and yWriter was the result.

I realize Word, OpenOffice and other modern word processors have outlining features, but they don’t have snapshot backups to sequential files like yWriter does. Roll back scenes to where they were half an hour ago, or re-read a version from four months ago - yWriter stores them all, automatically.

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^—all the above is c/p’ed from the main website.

I just really wanted to share this with others who might be in need of a really, super useful and FREE writing program to help them keep track of their longer works of fiction.  While I love using programs like google Docs, and do still use it for my roughs, Y!writer is really helpful to the editing process in being able to easily drag and drop scenes around wherever you want them, or navigate quickly through huge backlogs of material. 

It also allows you to create tags that let you know what characters are in each scenes, where important items turn up, what locations you’re at—and will even run reports to see how many instances you’re using of particular words.  Best of all, you can easily export the entire project into a word doc, pdf, or (in beta, i think) ebook.

If you haven’t checked this out, it may be worth a shot.

for my writer friends! :D

I love ywriter! I will never go back to writing in Word again!

psychmajorpizzamaker:

fight-0ff-yourdem0ns:

optimus-primette:

stunningpicture:

He designed this special shoes, shared between him and his paralyzed daughter just to make her feel the sensation of walking.

WEEP DAFEELS PENETRATE ME

Oh my goodness

This is probably so good for her body, too! Imagine her muscles getting moved in ways they don’t normally and she is upright and hopefully not having any pressure spots! This is lovely in so many ways!

mapsbynik:

Nobody lives here: The nearly 5 million Census Blocks with zero population

A Block is the smallest area unit used by the U.S. Census Bureau for tabulating statistics. As of the 2010 census, the United States consists of 11,078,300 Census Blocks. Of them, 4,871,270 blocks totaling 4.61 million square kilometers were reported to have no population living inside them. Despite having a population of more than 310 million people, 47 percent of the USA remains unoccupied.

Green shading indicates unoccupied Census Blocks. A single inhabitant is enough to omit a block from shading.

tango-mango:

Baking peanut butter cookies with Spinosaurus
The other day Spinosaurus dropped by for a visit. It was a great surprise to see him because he’s usually so busy, he doesn’t have time to hang out here the way he used to. I was just about to make some peanut butter cookies and he asked if he could help. As you can see, he was a great assistant! Hopefully he will come by more often and help with other projects in the kitchen and garden.
These peanut butter cookies are slightly chewy and coated in a thin layer of sugar, perfect for dunking in a glass of milk or your morning espresso. I’ve been baking them forever, but yesterday I realized it is more fun to make them with a friend. A recipe from Better Homes and Gardens.
Ingredients:
1/2 cup peanut butter
1/2 cup butter, softened
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 egg
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
Directions:
Beat peanut butter and butter with electric mixer on medium to high speed for 30 seconds. Add granulated sugar and brown sugar, baking soda, and salt. Beat until combined, scraping sides of bowl occasionally. Beat in egg and vanilla until combined. Beat in as much of the flour as you can with the mixer. Stir in any remaining flour. Cover and refrigerate dough about 1 hour or until easy to handle.
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Shape dough in 1-inch balls. Place balls 2 inches apart on an ungreased cookie sheet. Flatten the cookies by making crisscross marks with fork tines or dinosaur footprint, dipping utensil in sugar between flattening each cookie. Bake about 8 minutes or until edges are lightly browned. Transfer to wire racks. Cool. Makes about 3 dozen cookies.
Share with friends.
Zoom Info
tango-mango:

Baking peanut butter cookies with Spinosaurus
The other day Spinosaurus dropped by for a visit. It was a great surprise to see him because he’s usually so busy, he doesn’t have time to hang out here the way he used to. I was just about to make some peanut butter cookies and he asked if he could help. As you can see, he was a great assistant! Hopefully he will come by more often and help with other projects in the kitchen and garden.
These peanut butter cookies are slightly chewy and coated in a thin layer of sugar, perfect for dunking in a glass of milk or your morning espresso. I’ve been baking them forever, but yesterday I realized it is more fun to make them with a friend. A recipe from Better Homes and Gardens.
Ingredients:
1/2 cup peanut butter
1/2 cup butter, softened
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1/2 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 egg
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
Directions:
Beat peanut butter and butter with electric mixer on medium to high speed for 30 seconds. Add granulated sugar and brown sugar, baking soda, and salt. Beat until combined, scraping sides of bowl occasionally. Beat in egg and vanilla until combined. Beat in as much of the flour as you can with the mixer. Stir in any remaining flour. Cover and refrigerate dough about 1 hour or until easy to handle.
Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Shape dough in 1-inch balls. Place balls 2 inches apart on an ungreased cookie sheet. Flatten the cookies by making crisscross marks with fork tines or dinosaur footprint, dipping utensil in sugar between flattening each cookie. Bake about 8 minutes or until edges are lightly browned. Transfer to wire racks. Cool. Makes about 3 dozen cookies.
Share with friends.
Zoom Info

tango-mango:

Baking peanut butter cookies with Spinosaurus

The other day Spinosaurus dropped by for a visit. It was a great surprise to see him because he’s usually so busy, he doesn’t have time to hang out here the way he used to. I was just about to make some peanut butter cookies and he asked if he could help. As you can see, he was a great assistant! Hopefully he will come by more often and help with other projects in the kitchen and garden.

These peanut butter cookies are slightly chewy and coated in a thin layer of sugar, perfect for dunking in a glass of milk or your morning espresso. I’ve been baking them forever, but yesterday I realized it is more fun to make them with a friend. A recipe from Better Homes and Gardens.

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 1/4 cups all-purpose flour

Directions:

Beat peanut butter and butter with electric mixer on medium to high speed for 30 seconds. Add granulated sugar and brown sugar, baking soda, and salt. Beat until combined, scraping sides of bowl occasionally. Beat in egg and vanilla until combined. Beat in as much of the flour as you can with the mixer. Stir in any remaining flour. Cover and refrigerate dough about 1 hour or until easy to handle.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Shape dough in 1-inch balls. Place balls 2 inches apart on an ungreased cookie sheet. Flatten the cookies by making crisscross marks with fork tines or dinosaur footprint, dipping utensil in sugar between flattening each cookie. Bake about 8 minutes or until edges are lightly browned. Transfer to wire racks. Cool. Makes about 3 dozen cookies.

Share with friends.

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